UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS

climate change

Scientists study fate of salmon in a changing Alaska landscape

A man and woman wading in a stream

From coastal shores to inland mountains, salmon are part of the fabric of Alaska. Salmon have been harvested by Alaska Natives for thousands of years and remain a critical part of the state’s commercial, recreational and subsistence fisheries. As anadromous fish, salmon spend the first months to years of their lives in freshwater before migrating…

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Laying the foundation for resilient coastal communities

Average temperatures in Alaska have increased twice as fast as anywhere in the country over the last century. This warming—as much as 6 degrees in winter and three degrees in summer—is expected to continue along with the effects of disappearing sea ice, thawing of permafrost, changes in fish and wildlife patterns, extreme flooding and erosion.…

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Mourning the loss of Mary Pete

Alaska Sea Grant is mourning the loss our dear friend and colleague Mary Ciuniq Pete, who passed away on Nov. 17, 2018, after a battle with cancer. We send our deepest condolences to Mary’s family, friends and the entire Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta region. Mary was a longtime member of our advisory committee and a fierce advocate…

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Scientists use app to engage citizens in ocean acidification study

Woman in black cap in web lab working with white bucket

Clam populations throughout Alaska have steadily declined for over 20 years, affecting subsistence, recreational and commercial harvesters. The exact causes of the decline are unknown. Suspected factors include habitat changes, environmental stressors, predation and, possibly, ocean acidification. Under the supervision of University of Alaska Fairbanks professor Amanda Kelley, PhD student Ashley Rossin is studying the…

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Investigating threats from invasive species in the Aleutians Islands

Some exciting science detective work is going on in the Aleutian Islands, home to 1,100 miles of remote marine habitat and some of the world’s richest fishing grounds. Because this sensitive region is vulnerable to the introduction of invasive and potentially harmful marine species, Alaska Sea Grant is participating in research to determine the threat…

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Building resilience in the Y-K Delta

The Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta of western Alaska is one the most rural parts the United States. With 56 villages scattered across some 50,000 square miles, the Y-K Delta region is rich with wild fish and game upon which its predominately Yup’ik residents heavily depend. As in other parts of coastal Alaska, the Delta is being hit…

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