UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS

research

Scientists study fate of salmon in a changing Alaska landscape

A man and woman wading in a stream

From coastal shores to inland mountains, salmon are part of the fabric of Alaska. Salmon have been harvested by Alaska Natives for thousands of years and remain a critical part of the state’s commercial, recreational and subsistence fisheries. As anadromous fish, salmon spend the first months to years of their lives in freshwater before migrating…

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Laying the foundation for resilient coastal communities

Average temperatures in Alaska have increased twice as fast as anywhere in the country over the last century. This warming—as much as 6 degrees in winter and three degrees in summer—is expected to continue along with the effects of disappearing sea ice, thawing of permafrost, changes in fish and wildlife patterns, extreme flooding and erosion.…

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Creative and innovative research proposals sought

Alaska Sea Grant is gearing up to fund new research to benefit Alaska. We invite researchers to submit pre-proposals for projects to be undertaken during 2020–2022. Investigators at academic, research, and education institutions throughout Alaska may apply for one- to two-year research projects. The deadline to apply is Feb. 15, 2019 by 5 p.m. Alaska…

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Symposium aims to bridge gaps between fishermen and scientists

Fishing and seafood-industry professionals will join academics at the 32nd Lowell Wakefield Fisheries Symposium in Anchorage next spring. The symposium’s theme is “Cooperative Research — strategies for integrating industry perspectives and insights in fisheries science.” Attendees will explore effective strategies and approaches to integrate industry perspectives and insights in fisheries science. The symposium is scheduled…

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Scientists use app to engage citizens in ocean acidification study

Woman in black cap in web lab working with white bucket

Clam populations throughout Alaska have steadily declined for over 20 years, affecting subsistence, recreational and commercial harvesters. The exact causes of the decline are unknown. Suspected factors include habitat changes, environmental stressors, predation and, possibly, ocean acidification. Under the supervision of University of Alaska Fairbanks professor Amanda Kelley, PhD student Ashley Rossin is studying the…

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Engaging teachers in Northern Gulf of Alaska research

Our marine education specialist, Marilyn Sigman, is developing K–12 education programs for the Northern Gulf of Alaska long-term ecological research site. The NGA-LTER, as it’s called, is a National Science Foundation–funded research area that runs from the mouth of the Copper River to Kodiak Island. Educational outreach to young students as well as undergraduate and…

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New Alaska Sea Grant-funded graduate students dive into research

smiling young woman in lab holding shark fin

Six graduate students from the University of Alaska became research fellows last summer and this fall with funding from Alaska Sea Grant. The students are working on projects that address scientific issues in Alaska coastal communities and ecosystems. Jesse Gordon is working with associate professor Anne Beaudreau on a project titled, “Integrating local ecological knowledge…

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Graying of the Fleet research wins national award

Alaska Sea Grant-supported researchers won a national award at Sea Grant Week in Portland, Ore., this month for a study on how to boost access to Alaska commercial fisheries by young and rural residents. The Sea Grant Association, comprised of Sea Grant program directors from 33 coastal universities, presented its Research to Application award to…

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